From the archives

LOOKING INTO THE PAST:An archaeological took place dig at Kilsyth's Cavalry Park in January 2004. (Pic ref. c6027)
LOOKING INTO THE PAST:An archaeological took place dig at Kilsyth's Cavalry Park in January 2004. (Pic ref. c6027)

A look through the files of the Kilsyth Chronicle

This week in 2004

KILSYTH SAYS GOODBYE: The head teacher who had led Kilsyth Primary School for nearly three decades, retired. Gordon McDonald (61) first came to the school in 1974 as depute to Frank Brooks and succeeded him in 1981. Mr McDonald said: “I have found Kilsyth a very good area to work in and parents are very supportive of what is happening in the school.’’ Retirement would afford him more time to indulge in his hobby of travelling all over Europe to hear opera with his wife.

This week in 1994

WINTER CHILL: Hot toddies and long johns were the order of the day when hardy members of the Forth & Clyde Canal Society took their first cruise of the year at Auchinstarry. Society member Donald McKinnon said: “It has really become an excuse to go out, blow away the cobwebs and have a drink with other members!’’

This week in 1953

CYCLING CHAMP: John Smith of Balcastle Gardens continued to grasp the silverware. At a Central Scotland Wheelers event in Larbert, he received road racing events for 25 miles, 50 miles and 100 miles. And no wonder, His average speed was thought to be 24 miles per hour!

This week in 1924

KIND KILSYTHIANS: A willingness to give to charity isn’t just an indicator of Kilsyth today. The employees of Messrs.Wm.Baird and Co donated £1190 over the course of the year, an increase of £40 on the year before. The biggest beneficiary was Glasgow Royal Infirmary which received £350. There was certainly a bias towards medical charities, some of whom were based in locations as far away as Saltcoats and Lanark.