From the archives

BB ON PARADE: Youngsters of 1st Kilsyth Boy's Brigade, are pictured at their parents evening in Burns and Old Parish Church in 2002. (Picture by Alan Murray, ref. 4300)
BB ON PARADE: Youngsters of 1st Kilsyth Boy's Brigade, are pictured at their parents evening in Burns and Old Parish Church in 2002. (Picture by Alan Murray, ref. 4300)

A look through the files of the Kilsyth Chronicle

This week in 2004

BACK ON BOARD: There was widespread relief when a long established Kilsyth firm wasn’t just saved from receivership – but announced plans to expand. Wilson and Garden who manufactured blackboards and audio visual systems were snapped up by an Essex-based firm called Fundamental e-Investments who were keen to put their money into another British-based company. As a consequence, jobs would remain in Kilsyth. Councillor Tom Barrie said: “This is great news for the town.”

This week in 1964

BACK IN TOWN: A former member of Kilsyth Pipe Band who had emigrated to America returned to meet old friends. William McGiness who was previously of Kelvin Way jetted back via Prestwick Airport with his wife Betty. The visit coincided with the fact that William had been playing with a pipe band from his new home of Worcester in a world piping championship in Ayr.

This week in 1954

GETTING TOUGH: Mr F.T. Kidd of Kilsyth Academy stated in his annual report that he’d had quite enough of parents not sending their children to school. He was aware that some youngsters were joining their mums in alternative activities, such as shopping trips to Glasgow or on the area’s many bus excusions. He stated: “I would appeal to parents to be honest and truthful concerning absence. It is shameful to send children back to school with a note that is a blatant untruth.”

This week in 1924

GRAND OPENING: Queenzieburn’s Miner’s Welfare Institute would mark its long awaited opening with a short ceremony and a dance. Meanwhile local miners were interested in acquiring a new lamp which promised to safeguard security in the pits. This contained an early on-off switch which stopped naked flames being exposed for long periods.