From the archives

TEEING OFFf: Youngsters of primaries four and five at Banton Primary School were treated to some golf tuition in 2002. (Picture by Alan Murray, ref. 4687)
TEEING OFFf: Youngsters of primaries four and five at Banton Primary School were treated to some golf tuition in 2002. (Picture by Alan Murray, ref. 4687)

A look through the files of the Kilsyth Chronicle

This week in 2004

MEDIEVAL VILLAGE:: Work on a village to be called Duncarron was set to be built on Forestry Commission land in the hills around Kilsyth, with the aim of bringing “real live history” to the public. The scheme was to be funded by volunteers from the Clanranald Trust at a cost of around £250,000. It was planned to include working forge, potters, weavers and dyers. Development manager Darren Moyes said: “We have the had the idea to do this for around eight years and it has taken a lot of planning for us to get to this stage.”

This week in 1964

FOND FAREWELL: Senior policemen from Scotland Yard were among those at the retiral party of former road haulier Bob Mowbray from Kilsyth, who during his 33 years’ police service in London cleaned up so many vice dens that most of the racketeers not already jailed moved out of the area. Superintendent Mowbray, who retired to a bungalow in Herne Bay, Kent, had been able to form and trained his own vice squad to clean up vice activity in Cable Street in Wapping’s dockland, making a huge impact within 18 months of his arrival.

This week in 1954

BLAZE EMERGENCY: An early morning fire, later traced to an electrical fault, severely damaged St Patrick’s Church in Kilsyth. The fire brigade were quickly on the scene, but the blaze destroyed much of the floor at the front of the church, and the wall at the side of the altar was badly damaged and the roof was scorched. If the fire had lasted a little longer it was thought the whole building would have been gutted. The alarm was raised by church officer Thomas Clelland of Kilsyth Congregational Church shortly after 5am.

This week in 1924

SCHOOLS ROW: Stirlingshire Education Authority held a meeting og “an extra animated nature” on the subject of sending Roman Catholic schoolchildren to Glasgow at the behest of the Scottish Education Department, even although provision for their religious instruction was available locally. The Chronicle reported that Authority members considered this diktat to be “oppressive and tyrannical” and “a piece of pure Prussianism”. It added: “The Department had simply crushed out their (the local authority) discretion under the iron heel”.