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A poetic tribute to Kilsyth

COLOURFUL STORY: The Kilsyth Historic Quilt has been a labour of love for heritage lovers at Garrell Vale, and now theres a poem to explain just what all those pictures and symbols mean.

COLOURFUL STORY: The Kilsyth Historic Quilt has been a labour of love for heritage lovers at Garrell Vale, and now theres a poem to explain just what all those pictures and symbols mean.

Anne Russell and the Optimists Group at the Garrell Vale Community Centre, have written a poem which explains the stories behind the panels in the area’s best-known quilt.

The Kilsyth History Quilt

This quilt was made in Garrell Vale for a ‘Journey of Discovery’

Contained within it are some scenes denoting part of our history,

It starts in the centre with ‘The Optimists’ and a golden crown,

This is the part of the Coat of Arms pertaining to our town.

The material that surrounds it, Kilsyth Tartan as it’s shown,

Was donated by Willie Chalmers, the creator, who’s well known.

Gazing at the corners, these symbols, if you’ll look

Crossed swords and miners’ lamp, shuttles and the open book.

In section one, the ‘Garrell Glen’, runs down from Kilsyth Hills,

Where many of us picnicked when we were boys and girls,

In two, we have the ‘Banton Loch’ where many men were killed,

The site of Kilsyth Battle before it was infilled.

In three, we see ‘The Curlers’ play their game upon the ice,

This represents the fact that Curling started in Kilsyth.

In four, the Romans left their mark at Criy and Twechar hills,

With remains of the fort, well and wall, at Castlehill and Barrhill.

In five, there is a miner coming off his shift at daybreak,

After digging underground all night, while his bones and body ached.

In six, there are walled gardens and a pond with ‘Colzium Estate’

Where once there stood a castle reputed to be great.

In seven, we have ‘The Bandstand’ in our town centre for all to see,

This renewed place of beauty was once known as ‘bleaching greens’.

In eight, we recollect the Miners and Weavers Rows,

With outside wash houses and toilets, not so long ago.

In nine, there’s Agriculture and the Farms all round about,

How many of us ‘howked tatties’ to spin the money out?

In ten, we have the Canal where once sailed the Gypsy Queen,

Also the place for transporting goods before roads and trains.

In eleven, The Churches the Gither’, where each can congregate,

To worship God Almighty in whichever way they may.

In twelve, ‘The Schools’ within our town providing education,

So every child is given a chance to receive a good foundation.

Finally the motto ‘SPE EXPECTAMUS’ – We look forward with hope,

When anyone comes through bad times, I’m sure this helps them cope.

For all who helped in any way to create the Kilsyth Historic Quilt,

This shows the spirit within each of us, in which our town’s been built.

 

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