Charity appeal

Wee Rebecca Fullerton, who was born with spina bifida, meets Gordon Ramsay OBE, Honorary Patron of the Scottish Spina Bifida Association at the charity's annual children's party
Wee Rebecca Fullerton, who was born with spina bifida, meets Gordon Ramsay OBE, Honorary Patron of the Scottish Spina Bifida Association at the charity's annual children's party

A CHILDREN’S charity which has its base in Cumbernauld is poised to hold a special open morning next week.

The key aim behind the event is to enrol “voluntary community ambassadors” for the area to help the Scottish Spina Bifida Association raise vital funds.

Lynsey Hamilton, community fundraising officer, pointed out that to fulfil its lifelong commitment of care and support to children and their families, the SSBA has to raise £1 million a year.

But less than one per cent of its funding comes from the government, meaning the organisation must raise nearly all its money from public donations.

Lynsey added: “This year we are asking the local community to support us by becoming voluntary community ambassadors.

“Whether you would like to represent your place of work, school, street or local shops, you can help us raise vital funds and awareness for this amazing charity which supports families as soon as a baby is diagnosed with the condition, and will continue to support both the individual and their family for life.”

If you would like to help make a difference to people’s lives, join the SSBA for coffee, tea and biscuits at their open morning, which is set to run from 10.30am until 12noon on Thursday (April 26), at The Dan Young Building, 6 Craighalbert Way, Cumbernauld.

To find out more about the charity – whose honorary patron is celebrity chef Gordon Ramsay – and how you can help, please call 01236 794508.

Spina bifida and hydrocephalus seriously affect the lives of more than 3000 children, young people and adults in Scotland each year.

Most of those born with spina bifida are paralysed from the waist down and will suffer lifelong urological problems.

In addition, 80 per cent of those born with spina bifida also have the condition hydrocephalus.

Both conditions cause lifelong complex disabilities.