Cumbernauld Rugby Club plea for locals to stop abusing their pitch

10-05-14 Pics James Clare. CUMBERNAULD Rugby Club. Disgruntled members of club unhappy at dog walkers allowing their dogs to foul on pitch. Jim Cochrane (green-ish top), President ;  John McDonald (tall guy with cap), Vice-president and Iain Calder, Treasurer.
10-05-14 Pics James Clare. CUMBERNAULD Rugby Club. Disgruntled members of club unhappy at dog walkers allowing their dogs to foul on pitch. Jim Cochrane (green-ish top), President ; John McDonald (tall guy with cap), Vice-president and Iain Calder, Treasurer.

The conduct of animals and their owners on turf owned by a local sports club has now been tackled at council level amidst fears that an expensively tended pitch is being ruined.

Members of Cumbernauld Rugby Club have become so concerned at the perceived misuse of their land that they have called on North Lanarkshire Council officials to put up signs to keep interlopers out.

As we reported last week, this includes pet owners who have allowing their dogs to foul the area but it does not end there as horse riders have been spied on the pitch in full gallop.

It’s believed that one of the horse owners in question complained to the council that a member had harangued her for riding on the pitch. However, it emerged that the Land Reform (Scotland) Act is on the side of the club.

President Jim Cochrane said: “This means that the general public can access our land but with certain restrictions. Horse riders, cyclists and dog walkers need to go round the surface of our playing area,

“Clearly this isn’t happening as there are a number of horse tracks and horse droppings over substantial areas of our playing field. It is causing considerable damage to our playing field,’’ he added.

Mr Cochrane stressed that this was the reason members involved the council - and staff were happy to oblige.

A spokesman for North Lanarkshire Council said: “Our Outdoor Access team has met with the rugby club and agreed to supply signage to clarify the rights and responsibilities of horse riders and others who are using the ground.

“The so-called ‘Right to Roam’ legislation is complex and while people do have the right to cross the land, they also have to be responsible in their use of it.

“We are happy to advise access takers and land owners when disputes like this occur.”