From the archives

A look through the files for the Cumbernauld News

1996

SUPERFAN Susan Bett from Eliot House in Kildrum got to meet her idol Sting after winning a competition on MTV. Susan had followed her hero as far afield as Japan and Australia to see his concerts. The contest allowed the 27 year old to make a ‘video diary’ of a massive German festival gig.

AN AFTER hours clinic at Central Health Centre opened which effectively ended callouts. It would help doctors avoid sleepless nights but staff warned that only illnesses needing immediate attention would be dealt with. A spokesman said: “The changes are designed to ensure that when you attend morning surgery, the doctor is alert, caring and at their best.’’

GREGORY’S Girl was coming back to Cumbernauld after it was revealed that the charming teenage comedy would be given a sequel. Following months of speculation, Channel 4 revealed that director Bill Forsyth would write and direct a £7 millon follow-up where the grown-up Gregory would return to his old school as a teacher. The new came just as Abronhill High prepared for its stage version of the show.

1986

A SHOCK announcement was made by Cumbernauld Development Corporation - who intended to SELL OFF Cumbernauld town centre. In what marked a dramatic departure from existing CDC policy, the organisation admitted that it was preparing to let the centre go and that job losses would be the unavoidable by-product of that decision. Meanwhile the fight was on to save jobs at Woolco, amidst fears that more than 100 staff would end up jobless when the superstor closed its doors in August.

CUMBERNAULD gymnastic coach Margaret Brady was named Citizen of the Year - after making a huge difference to the lives of youngsters involved in sport. More than 100 girls attended her class weekly and many had risen to prominence in Scottish and British squads as a result of Mrs Brady’s expertise.

A FORMER entertaiments officer for Cumbernauld & Kilsyth District Council was the victor in the Cumbernauld Half Marathon. Fast mover Jim Stone completed the course in one hour, nine minutes and four seconds. Rod no longer worked in Cumbernauld but saw the race as a homecoming as he had a soft spot for the town. “I only entered for sentimental reasons,” he said.

1976

PUPILS at Greenfaulds High School were preparing to stage their own production of Fiddler on The Roof which would run for four nights in the school’s very own auditorium. More than 50 pupils would take part and drama teacher Robert Morson would be directing. The show was the biggest the school had produced.

YOU’re going nowhere - that was the message from Cumbernauld & Kilsyth District Council, after attempts were made to send delegates to the Montreal Olympics. Moves were afoot to ‘twin’ the world’s twin towns with the Olympic Village and in theory, Cumbernauld’s link with Bron would make council representatives eligible. However the suggestion was shot down in flames and a goodwill telegram was deemed an appropriate substitute.

RATS attacked as striking binmen refused to back down as the dispute neared its fourth week and rubbish piled up on the streets Greenfaulds lad Shane Henderson (7) was bitten by a rodent but his mum Margaret said: “I’ve told children to keep away from these dumps. I don’t blame the dustmen. I think they are quite right to hold out against a cut in their money.’’

1970

A TRIO from Carbrain organised a petition, in a last ditch bid to find somewhere to play. David Brown (12) his brother Ian (10) and their pal William Sommerville from Greenrigg Road collected 180 signatures in one evening. Ian and William’s dad John explained: “There is a swing park nearby but the older children prevent the younger ones from playing there.’’

CARPET manufacturers John Lyle Limited dropped a bombshell - stating that jobs would be shed at their Cumbernauld operation and that anyone who wished to continue working with the firm would have to transfer to its Glasgow factory. Workers had specialised in the creating the popular ‘Sparkler’ range which had been popular with the export market but trade had slumped. The news was announced shortly after 400 Burroughs workers learned that they faced redundancy.

A NEW assistant minister arrived at St Mungo’s Parish Church, after completing his studies at Edinburgh University. Reverend David Harper who originally hailed from Dumfriesshire would be living in Seafar with his wife. He said: “I’m sure I’m going to enjoy my spell in the new town.’’