From the archives

A look back through the files of the Cumbernauld News.

1996

BRIGHT spark David Hart from Seafar was named Scotland’s top apprentice. He triumphed in the electrical industry’s contest after hitting high scores in training exercises and impressing judged during a final interview. David was putting his expertise to good use for Balfour Kilpatrick.

“I’M not moving, even for £1 million.’’ That was the view of embattled campaigner Albert MacBeath whose Castlecary home bordered the A80. Arthur (35) who used a wheelchair faced a nightmare wait to find out if his house would be demolished. An artist’s impression of proposed site depicted a tree where the MacBeath household should have been but the dad-of-three Albert said: “I will lay down in front of the bulldozers.’’

A CUMBERNAULD woman was strutting her stuff twice nightly at the world famous Lido night-spot in Paris, bedecked in stunning outfits and headdresses. Bluebell Girl Lyn Fitzsimons (22) was one of just two Scots at the legendary Lido and her dad David flew to Paris to see her perform. He said: “I was lucky she told me where she was in the chorus as I would have struggled to recognise her with her makeup and costumes on. Lyn loves her job and living in Paris but it’s hard work.”

1986

DISGUSTED staff walked out of HMRC to voice support with their fellow civil servants in a very different workplace. That was GCHQ in Cheltenham where 13 staff members had been disciplined for joining a trade union which had been deemed an illegal move following a court case. A meeting was organised for local tax office workers at the Muirfield Centre after 700 deserted the building in protest.

A YOUNG BMX rider was to represent his country at the sport’s world championships being held in Slough, after triumphing in a tournament in Forres. David Robb was representing the Westfield and Abronhill Club and was already distinguishing himself in the Under 7s category.

CUMBERNAULD took its place at the forefront of new technology when five local companies were represented at the Scottish Electronic Technology Show in Glasgow. Cumbernauld Development Corporation also attended to attract investment.

PALACERIGG was playing host to the creme de la creme,... of Scotland’s guinea pigs! Proud owners of the cute pets would converge on the beauty spot and locals were urged to bring their own guinea pigs along to the event.

1976

OVERCROWDING at Condorrat Primary saw parents see red after education bosses announced that Primary 7 pupils would be transferred to the new Ravenswood Primary which was scheduled to open in the new session. Parent spokeswoman Jean Harris of Lomond View said: “We don’t want any children taken there. There’s no guarantee Ravenswood will have the room.”

DUSTMEN were to break their own strike after agreeing to lift the rubbish that was proving to be a hazard for the elderly and disabled. Teams of strikers agreed to bring piles of rubbish to an emergency dump. In general terms the strike showed no signs of abating as the row over cuts to bonuses continued. The News that the Government planned to impose further cuts on council spending did not bode well as deadlock continued.

AN EXTENSIVE hunt for an expensive showdog was underway after a German Shepherd called Flicka went missing from Abronhill. The animal whose showname was Garloch Adventurous had last been seen in the Laburnum Road area after chasing a pet cat. Owner Diana Sirling had contacted every police station in a 20 mile radius of Cumbernauld and offered a reward for Flicka’s safe return.

1970

StuDENT teacher Joyce Davidson gained the Gold Standard in the Duke of Edinburgh’s Award Scheme and would receive the award from the duke himself at the Palace of Holyrood. The 20 year old from Abronhill who was studying in Dundee would travel through to Edinburgh to meet the Duke at the popular garden party event.

A GIANT blaze swept through a Cumbernauld factory causing £15,000 worth of damage. The Sunn Metal Treatments plant in Blairlinn fell prey to a blaze that nine brave staff members tried to contain before fire crews rushed to the scene. A quarter of the premises was destroyed in the inferno. Later a spokesman said: “I think the blaze was caused by an electrical fault. The whole premises will now have to be re-wired.

a CONTROVERSIAL report stated that Cumbernauld Shopping Centre was a flop after a local postgraduate architect made the ‘megastructure’ part of his thesis at Strathclyde University. Nicholas Low of Elliot House in Kildrum stated: “People in the survey I took did not do their shopping in the way the Cumbernauld Plan expected.’’ He then stated that a high proportion of locals were doing the bulk of their shopping outwith the new town – after travelling to Glasgow.