From the archives

Launch of North Lanarkshire Council's economic development unit at Colzium House in May 1996. Pictured are (from left) councillor Harry Curran, convener of NLC's economic development committee; Alf Young, economic editor, The Herald; Barry McCulloch, deputy provost; and Councillor Harry McGuigan, leader of North Lanarkshire Council
Launch of North Lanarkshire Council's economic development unit at Colzium House in May 1996. Pictured are (from left) councillor Harry Curran, convener of NLC's economic development committee; Alf Young, economic editor, The Herald; Barry McCulloch, deputy provost; and Councillor Harry McGuigan, leader of North Lanarkshire Council

A look through the files of the Cumbernauld News

1996

FEARS that a much treasured beauty spot was going to the dogs were played down by North Lanarkshire Council – which had controversially introduced an admission charge to its surroundings. The local authority had taken Palacerigg Country Park under their jurisdiction but some local had expressed fears that the area was becoming run down and that animals were being neglected. The council stressed that they had appointed a new manager Chris Bennard. “We have had no official complaints about the general appearance of the park,’’ said a spokesman.

TEEN band The Anonymous were scheduled to play a gig on familiar turf. For every member of the group was a pupil at St Maurice’s High School in Westfield, Cumbernauld. Despite their tender years, the lads had played gigs at Glasgow’s Brewhouse and the Cathouse. And a CD release was in the offing, in a bid to secure radio play. Meanwhile, another local band on the bill was Jeep Seats, who had both a single and an album scheduled for imminent release.

LOCALS were starring in a production of Carousel at the King’s Theatre – Samantha Dougall from Greenfaulds plus brother and sister Gillian and Gregg Lloyd from Abronhill.

1986

CONDORRAT Flower Show was judged to be on the up after a highly successful event was staged on a grander scale. Innovations like charity stalls and a march through the village would seem to have contributed to a rise in visitor numbers. Secretary of Condorrat and District Horticultural Society Alan Sneddon said: “That is exactly what we wanted.We have proved that by trying new ideas we can bring new people in.’’

ANTI-NUCLEAR protesters were set to take part in the Arms Across Scotland link-up which would involved 35,000 nationwide. Cumbernauld CND, churchgoers and individuals would be bussed through to Kilsyth to participate. Cumbernauld Theatre would host Rocking For Peace concert in the evening – and the event was a sellout.

BIRD breeder from across the globe were flocking to the Lesser Town Hall after Cumbernauld Cage Bird Society staged its second open show. The public would be allowed in at a charge of 20 pence to see the birds. A club spokesman said: “Last year we attracted more than 700 entries and we are aiming to beat that this year. There will be birds from Africa, Australia and India being entered in this competition.”

1976

NEW town growth looked as if it might be curbed after the contents of a secret report were made public. It emerged that the town’s residents would be encouraged to RETURN to Glasgow in a bid to stop feared over-population in Cumbernauld. A Cumbernauld Development Corporation spokesman admitted: “If these arrangements were terminated it would cause us no distress. We would not bother about it.’’ But a Strathclyde Regional Council spokesman stressed that the report’s findings had NOT become official policy.

A SHOCK poll conducted on behalf of the East Dunbartonshire Conservative Association appeared to show that the Tories were on course to capture the constituency from Scottish Nationalist MSP Margaret Bain. The poll had been conducted by an independent organisation using a computer-drawn sample of voters in the week following the Prime Minister’s visit to Scotland. Prospective parliamentary candidate Michael Hurst said: “Our poll is showing a swing back to us.’’ But Mrs Bain insisted that the Nats were ahead – and that an upcoming poll would prove it.

DULLATUR man Iain McWhinnie appeared on TV’s “The Generation Game” with his mum Jessie.

1971

a CUMBERNAULD housewife won first prize in a competition which had attracted more than 20,000 entries from across Britain. Philomena Moore (27) of Alder Road Abronhill received a cheque for £500 in the nationwide contest run by Associated Biscuits. The shopkeeper who sold the biscuits to Philomena was Margaret Allison, whose business was also in Alder Road – and she won a television for doing so.

ARMY Cadets brought honour to Cumbernauld. The local branch won the County Banner for being the most proficient unit in Dunbartonshire. They had beaten 11 other units to do so. Meanwhile plans were afoot for Cumbernauld to have its very own Territorial Army Unit. Two Scottish regiments said that they would spearhead a recruiting drive in the town to create a 40 strong force.

CHAIRWOMAN of Cumbernauld Development Corporation Jean Roberts retired and colleagues paid tribute. Bailie Tom Young praised Dame Jean’s outstanding service in many spheres of public life - and also stressed the fact that she had been involved with the CDC from the very beginning. A retirement dinner with new chair, Sir Donald Liddle was planned.