FROM THE ARCHIVES

AT THE FLICKS: This old poster gives an insight into what was showing at the Pavilion Cinema in Kilsyth during the second week of August 1939.
AT THE FLICKS: This old poster gives an insight into what was showing at the Pavilion Cinema in Kilsyth during the second week of August 1939.

A look through the files of the Cumbernauld News

This week in 1997

MISSiONARY Elma Armstrong visited Cumbernauld after a 21 year absence from the town. She had left her home in South Carbrain for Peru and had married a local pastor. She invited anyone who remembered her to attend a very special evening at Carbrain Baptist Church where she would share her experiences of life in the troubled country where poverty and guerilla warfare were all too common. She was also able to introduce two of her children, Ian and Jennifer to their Scottish relatives.

This week in 1987

A​FTER 40 years ‘down under’ Cumbernauld native Mary Clark nee McAnlish returned to the town- and couldn’t believe the changes. Her point of departure was 1948 where the ‘new town’ was not even a twinkle in the architect’s eyes. Mary who lived in Yagoona in Sydney was staying with pals Jim and Jean Anderson in Scott House and liked a lot of what she saw. She said: “The appearance of everything has changed but the people are still lovely. Everyone from friends to shop assistants have been so kind.’’

This week in 1977

CUMBERNAULD High School reeled under another body blow, shortly after a full scale act of wilful fire raising on campus. Shocked staff and pupils learned that the school’s highly successful farm project had been ransacked by thieves. A quarter of an acre site on Palacerigg Road was stripped of its potato crop and garden tools were lifted in the daring raid. Headteacher James Mearns was convinced that adults were involved. A police spokesperson said: “Housewives in the New Town should be wary of anyone selling cheap potatoes.’’

This week in 1972

A TRIP to Canada by Cumbernauld’s provost would have appeared to have paid off. Gordon Murray joined members of the Caledonian Pipe Band at a championship in Toronto and met potential investors during the trip. He said: “A lot of important people who have never heard about Cumbernauld certainly know about it now.’’ These included civic heads, goverment officials and industrialists. An Ontrarian new town called Bramlea was even being mooted as a twin for Cumbernauld.