MP welcomes total ban on fracking in Scotland

Flashback to last year, when Ineos at Grangemouth received its first consignment of fracked gas from the USA - where fracking continues unabated.  Ineos chief James Ratcliffe said it could inspire "a British shale gas revolution".
Flashback to last year, when Ineos at Grangemouth received its first consignment of fracked gas from the USA - where fracking continues unabated. Ineos chief James Ratcliffe said it could inspire "a British shale gas revolution".

Cumbernauld, Kilsyth and Kirkintilloch East‘s MP has warmly welcomed the decision to ban fracking - arguing there’s no case for approval.

In a lengthy and detailed reply to the Scottish Government’s consultation on the issue Stuart McDonald MP says there would be little or no benefit for households if it went ahead.

He said any supposed benefit would have to be weighed against the potential disruption and negative consequences to residents of heavy industry “on their doorstep” – and the effect it could have on family life and even tourism.

He’s also convinced the Scottish Government decision is fully endorsed by the majority of his own constituents.

The MP said: “As unconventional oil and gas deposits occur in and around former coalfields and oil shale fields in Scotland’s Central Belt, this densely-populated constituency area would be directly affected if fracking in particular was given the go-ahead.”

Mr McDonald said enough evidence had been produced to show there was a significant impact of people’s health being put at risk - including that of workers on any fracking project.

Meanwhile he said he isn’t convinced the economic arguments stacked up, as even if fracking delivered its assumed potential it would only add 0.1 per cent to Scotland’s GDP.

He added: “In the case of unconventional oil and gas, I do not think that case has been successfully made. “Further, I believe that remote possibilities that might be realised in decades to come do not justify a decision to speculatively lift the moratorium now”.

Chemicals firm Ineos, which is importing shale oil from America - and which supports fracking in Scotland - said the decision meant the opportunity to benefit would now go to England.