They built a hospital for Malawi

Striking the right chord: From left, voluntary workers Anna Sewell, Judy Barrett, Ciaran Mchale, and Colin Reilly and Kieran Taylor who are both from Cumbernauld
Striking the right chord: From left, voluntary workers Anna Sewell, Judy Barrett, Ciaran Mchale, and Colin Reilly and Kieran Taylor who are both from Cumbernauld

TWO charity volunteers from Cumbernauld have helped to change the lives of a community in Malawi through donations from their charitable church parish.

Kieran Taylor (19), from the Village, and Colin Reilly (18), from Condorrat, ventured to Nancholi in Malawi to help build a community hospital which could help save the lives of thousands of people in the area’s township by providing every-day medication and treatment.

The Glasgow University students are both parishioners at the Sacred Heart Church in Kildrum, and made their journey to Malawi on the back of money raised by the church’s charity group, the Sacred Heart Third World Group.

Kieran, said: “We were very grateful for the donation of £2,500 from the Third World Group. Without it the project couldn’t have gone ahead.

“We also received help from two other local businesses whom we are extremely grateful to.

“The clinic provides services in a rural village, inaccessible by road and 25 kilometres away from the nearest hospital. Many people die of preventable diseases on their way to hospital in that area, so the clinic provides three vital services; inoculations for children under five, maternity and post natal care and testing/counselling services for those afflicted with HIV or AIDS.

“Both I and Colin were overwhelmed with the support we received from within the church.”

Kieran has returned to Cumbernauld with many memories from his time in Malawi and the trip has given him a new perspective on the differences between the culture in Malawi and here in Scotland.

He added: “I think a lot of people thought it would be a culture shock going over there, but the shock is more when you come back.

“I feel as if a lot of things go to waste here. People there are very resourceful but it’s very materialistic here. You go on a bus there and everyone is talking to each other but here, no-one looks at each other.”