When you go down to the woods

FUN IN THE FOREST: The schoolboys with Barney Kinsler (back left) and rangers David McFarlane (left) and Dermot McMahon (right).
FUN IN THE FOREST: The schoolboys with Barney Kinsler (back left) and rangers David McFarlane (left) and Dermot McMahon (right).

PUPILS from St. Andrew’s and Cumbernauld Primary Schools have constructed an outdoor learning space in woods near their shared campus.

A team of 12 primary six boys, six from each school, were selected for this project in Cumbernauld Community Park, with funding coming from the Community Projects Fund.

The pupils learned such woodland survival skills as setting up a camp, fire lighting, tree cutting, mini-beast identification, outdoor cooking and woodcrafting. North Lanarkshire Council countryside ranger Davie MacFarlane is also involved in the project, helping the children learn woodland skills.

The boys also used computer system Glow to write blogs and upload pictures and video to keep everyone up to date with their progress, as well as giving a weekly report at assembly.

Barney Kinsler, chairman of the Friends of Cumbernauld Community Park, said “We are delighted to be able to facilitate a new enterprise of this order in the Park. The Park is a major resource for Cumbernauld schools who already work with our group in planting, bulbs and trees and help to clear up litter.

”The educational aspect of outdoor classrooms is of considerable use to local schools. We would hope that despite current cuts and restrictions on service that this vital function can be retained and expanded elsewhere.”

Barney Kinsler, chairman of the Friends of Cumbernauld Community Park, said “We are delighted to be able to facilitate a new enterprise of this order in the Park. The Park is a major resource for Cumbernauld schools who already work with our group in planting, bulbs and trees and help to clear up litter.

”The educational aspect of outdoor classrooms is of considerable use to local schools. We would hope that despite current cuts and restrictions on service that this vital function can be retained and expanded elsewhere.”